Saul’s sin

Below is the institute Manuel’s take on Saul and why he list the right to his kingdom.

This wad another case where I knew the story but missed the details.  If Saul had been patient even one more day he would not have lost his kingdom.  Instead the Israelites would have been utterly victorious because the Lord would have fought their battle alongside them.

A reminder here.  A king is bit a bad thing … If you gave good men as your king.

It was not long before Saul began to have an exaggerated opinion of his power and importance. This tendency is natural to men who forget the Lord and trust in themselves. The Prophet Joseph Smith said, “We have learned by sad experience that it is the nature and disposition of almost all men, as soon as they get a little authority, as they suppose, they will immediately begin to exercise unrighteous dominion” (D&C 121:39). It is true that this was a time of great crisis. The Philistines were amassed in great strength and the people were deserting from Saul’s army (see 1 Samuel 13:6). When Samuel was late in coming, Saul took things into his own hands and offered the sacrifices. This action was a great sin.
“Think also of Saul who had been called from the field to be made king of the nation. When the Philistines were marshalled against Israel in Michmash, Saul waited for Samuel, under whose hand he had received his kingly anointing and to whom he had looked in the days of his humility for guidance; he asked that the prophet come and offer sacrifices to the Lord in behalf of the people. But, growing impatient at Samuel’s delay, Saul prepared the burnt offering himself, forgetting that though he occupied the throne, wore the crown, and bore the scepter, these insignia of kingly power gave him no right to officiate even as a deacon in the Priesthood of God; and for this and other instances of his unrighteous presumption he was rejected of God and another was made king in his place.” (Talmage, Articles of Faith, pp. 184–85.)
The circumstances were critical, but one of the purposes of mortality is to demonstrate that one will remain faithful and obedient under all circumstances (see D&C 98:14–15). Saul failed that test and thereby lost his right to be God’s representative of the people.

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One thought on “Saul’s sin

  1. Pingback: The Hardest Thing I’ve Ever Done: How I Changed My Name to Saul of Hearts | SoshiTech - Social Media Technology - Soshitech.com

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